More on the Quaker blogosphere

Briefly — On the topic of a Quaker blogging “book of discipline,”* there’s a conversation going on in the comments to a recent post by Brooklyn Quaker (beginning here) about that very subject. The post is about the issue of whether the idea that “there is that of God in every person” is a traditional Quaker idea or a modern one, but at one point Rich felt he needed to delete some comments, and afterwards asked his readers for feedback. I’m posting about it because I think it’s a good idea (as I blogged about last month).


*I think this is a better name for such a concept than “Faith and Practice,” because “Faith & Practice” implies that we Quaker bloggers somehow have a common “faith,” when we obviously do not. But despite this, we could come up with a common set of guidelines for handling disputes, etc., and I think “Book of Discipline” captures this better as a phrase (and also, in my limited reading of old F&Ps/BoDs, when a YM book is called a “book of discpline” it tends to focus on just that – practices and procedures, rather than theology).

1 Response to “More on the Quaker blogosphere ”


  1. 1 Pam Jul 25th, 2006 at 11:01 pm

    I like the idea of calling it a “book of discipline”. I think I originally shied away from the idea because it didn’t seem as if anything like a “Faith and Practice” was required or possible.

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  • I am separated, as to bodily presence, from you; but I cannot forget you, because ye are written on my heart, and I cannot but desire your peace and welfare, as of my own soul.

    And this is my present cry for you. Oh that ye might feel the breath of life, that life which at first quickened you, and which still quickeneth, being felt; and that breath of life has power over death; and being felt by you, will bow down death in you, and ye will feel the seed lifting up its head over that which oppresseth it.

    Isaac Penington
    To friends of truth in and about the two Chalfonts

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